Local budding businesswoman and mother Shannon Rinckey is launching a new product called Mama's Got Mail. (Photo: Staff)

After an evolution of her business, budding entrepreneur Shannon Rinckey is launching a product that could have national appeal and is aimed at supporting mothers everywhere. 

Mama's Got Mail is monthly subscription service that Rinckey said makes great gifts. It's convenient, easy and delightful, she said. 

"Every month, it's a surprise and something new," she said. "It shows up on your doorstep the first week of the month."

Mama's Got Mail 

Rinckey is now accepting preorders for May delivery. 

One month costs $49

Six months costs $44 a month

A year costs $39 a month

Click here for more information. 

The subscription is available for one month, six months or a year. 

The gifts and the ideas for the presents come directly from Rinckey—a mother of four.

The gifts encourage mothers to take a moment for themselves, to treat themselves, because often mothers put others, such as their children and husband, first, she said. 

The box also comes with a self-check in to help support mental and emotional health. 

Rinckey, who has a bachelor’s degree in business and communication and a master’s in counseling, recently released an e-book aimed at addressing the emotional and psychological challenges of being a stay-at-home mom.

It was part of her business, SAHMconsulting. SAHM is an acronym for "stay-at-home mother." 

But the e-book was a “big flop,” she said. She considered giving up and shutting down SAHMconsulting. But then, she got inquiries about phone counseling, so she started doing that.

And, soon after, she found mentor Sheila Boyington, co-founder of Chattanooga’s Thinking Media.

Boyington worked with Rinckey to tweak the business idea. 

"What I did was challenge her to come up with things that she enjoyed doing, first of all, and [find] a way to be able to generate revenue on a sustainable basis as opposed to selling your time," Boyington told Nooga.com in January. "You can only sell so much of your time, so you are limited. Our big thing has always been creating something that can be sent in a box." 

And that's when the proverbial light bulb went off in Rinckey's head. 

Mama's Got Mail is a monthly subscription surprise specifically for mothers. (Photo: Staff)

"What if it was a box?" she said. 

Moms don't want to pay for information, such as the e-book, but Rinckey has high hopes for this product, she said. 

The first year she is going to focus on Chattanooga, and then in the second year, she wants to expand to the rest of the Southeast. And she hopes she will eventually be taking orders from people nationwide. 

Rinckey hopes that the arrival of the monthly surprise will delight the women and make them feel like part of a larger community of mothers.

"For whatever reason, grown women don't get a lot of surprise fun mail," she said.

In April, she will start advertising the product more as Mother's Day approaches. 

She will take orders the first two weeks of every month, so she can then order the amount of supplies she needs to fill that demand. So customers have to order a month ahead of when they want the first gift to arrive. And the boxes go out the first week of every month. 

The first gift Rinckey is unveiling is called "fat and fiction"—coconut oil and a novel. Coconut oil can be used for cooking or taken in a spoonful to boost health, she said. She envisions mothers taking a moment for themselves at the end of the day to take the coconut oil and read a book. 

"It's a healthy fat," she said. "So if you just did one thing today to take care of yourself, [this could be it]. It's good, fun things—no mops, no irons, no whisks." 

Other potential presents are a "chick flick" and cozy blanket, a craft kit, beauty products or a tree to plant in honor of the recipient. 

And she can't stop coming up with ideas for gifts. That's the fun, creative part, she said. 

Rinckey said she is beyond excited for her new business and the opportunity to support mothers.

"Doing good for other people is most important," she said.