Jenny Gabrielsson Mare in "Wolves." (Screenshot: YouTube)

The music of Swedish singer Jenny Gabrielsson Mare is cloaked in shadow and graceful theatricality. Her work draws from any number of influences, including diversions through pop, rock and jazz aesthetics. It's a difficult sound to describe and almost as difficult to decipher. She's not purposefully keeping her audience away; she's just asking for a little bit more in return than your average musician. Looking to the dark winters and gorgeous vistas of Sweden for inspiration, Mare gathers a mixture of sight, sound and experience, and expels it in various forms. She's looking to release a new album in November, and we can rest assured that it will possess that same calm and spectral beauty that adorned her previous work.

In her new video for "Wolves," she evokes an eerie intangibility, the kind of fleeting, whispered sensation that slinks along the length of your spine before settling deep in your bones. The music rises slowly before reaching a measured momentum and maintaining a sustained feeling of elusiveness—the notes feel like moonlight sliding through your fingers. It's not nearly enough to feel the music's touch; you want to be completely enveloped by it—though it fades to smoke and light before you can get a good grip.

Mare's stark piano rhythms meld with a slithering bass and string framework that gives her the freedom to move anywhere within this landscape and to do whatever she wants to do. Bits of cello spring to life with clacking percussive flourishes and faint scraps of animalistic noises. Directed by Mare herself, the video finds the singer surrounded by quick bursts of archaic renderings of wolves and other related imagery. We see her wearing a wolf mask, completely embracing that feral side of herself and the music. It's a beautiful and dangerous feeling that never loses its hold on you.

Joshua Pickard covers local and national music, film and other aspects of pop culture. You can contact him on Facebook, Twitter or by email. The opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, not Nooga.com or its employees.