I had a bit of leftover cheese sauce that Iu00a0drizzled on top of the lasagna after it was done. (Photo: Shawanda Mason)
Ingredients
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  • 8 tbsp butter

  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

  • 1 tsp dried basil

  • 1 tsp dried oregano

  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt and pepper

  • 1/4 cup flour

  • 2 cups milk

  • 2 cups chicken broth

  • 1 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded

  • 1 cup Parmesan, grated

  • 2 cups whole milk ricotta

  • 2 cups Italian-blend cheese, shredded

  • 2 packages frozen spinach, thawed and drained

  • 1 box no-boil lasagna noodles

  • 3 oz prosciutto, torn

My husband recently made it known that I’d never made lasagna for him. I was a bit baffled at first. Of all the dinners I’ve made us, surely I’d made lasagna before? I’m certainly not an expert in lasagna making, but I’m not new to it, either. But after going through my food memory bank, I realized that the husband was indeed correct. I’d never made lasagna for him, which means it’s been at least five years since I’ve even made lasagna. How tragic.

I used to make lasagna, chicken Parmesan and spaghetti all the time-you know, the basic Italian fare. Spaghetti is still my go-to meal when I’m too lazy to think of anything else. It’s one of my favorite comfort foods. Anyway, before I was further reminded of my lack of lasagna cooking, I remedied that problem with what I think is the perfect lasagna meal.

Once in a blue moon, I peruse the siteHalf Baked Harvest. If you haven’t visited this site, please do. The photos are beautiful, and her recipes are spot-on.

I nearly stopped in my tracks when I saw the recipe for her cheesy prosciutto lasagna. I only wish I could take full credit for this recipe-but once in a while, someone brilliant comes along and provides me with a recipe that I have to recreate almost exactly. The only major change I made to the recipe was slightly altering one of the cheeses.

If you’re a lasagna connoisseur, you know that no-boil noodles exist and they’re the best. They take out the extra step of having to boil noodles and wait for them to be done. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, take a trip down the pasta aisle of the grocery store and you’ll see exactly what I mean. I love them and cannot wait to make this dish again.

A pan of cheesy prosciutto lasagna. (Photo: Shawanda Mason)

Heat the oven to 350 degrees and grease a baking dish. A 9-by-13-inch pan will work.

In a medium saucepan, melt butter, then add the garlic, basil, oregano, salt and pepper. Cook about 30 seconds. Be careful not to burn the garlic.

Whisk in the flour and cook for a minute. Slowly add in the milk and the broth. Bring it to a boil and stir.

After about a minute, remove it from heat and stir in the mozzarella cheese and a half-cup of the Parmesan. Stir until the cheese sauce is smooth; set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the ricotta, Italian-blend cheese and spinach. Add a pinch of salt.

The bits of prosciutto are crunchy and saltyu2014it’s the best. (Photo: Shawanda Mason)

Get your prepared baking dish and spread a bit of the cheese sauce in the bottom. Top the sauce with lasagna sheets and then spread half the ricotta mixture on top. Repeat the process starting with cheese sauce (not all of it) and lasagna noodles, then top with the rest of the ricotta and more cheese sauce. Top with more noodles (you should have three layers of noodles), and pour the rest of the cheese sauce on top.

Sprinkle the rest of the Parmesan cheese on top, and even more cheese, if desired. Arrange the prosciutto on top and bake for 45 minutes or until the top is all bubbly, cheesy and golden. Oh, yeah.

Serve with a small side salad and get ready to be wowed.

Cheesy lasagna is the best. (Photo: Shawanda Mason)

Shawanda Mason is the creator and blogger of Eat.Drink.Frolic. For recipe questions or to chat about eating, drinking or frolicking, she can be reached at [email protected] or by following her on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. The opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, not Nooga.com or its employees.

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