In honor of its 50th anniversary, “Bonnie and Clyde” will screen at a couple of local theaters this week.

The Week in Film is a column dedicated to bringing awareness to award-winning films, special movie screenings, rereleases, limited-distribution runs and avant cinema that should be seen in theaters to be properly appreciated.

Bonnie and Clyde
Directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, “Bonnie and Clyde” chronicles the rise and fall of the Barrow Gang, who went on a spree of bank robberies and murders that finally culminated in their gruesome deaths at the hands of a group of Texas Rangers. Known for the explicit violence of its closing scene, the film garnered a reputation as one of the first films of the New Hollywood era, a time when films used more violence, sex and counterculture ideology to create sympathy for and fascination with its often-anti-heroic characters. For its 50th anniversary, the film will be shown in limited engagements across the country, and if you’re a fan of the film (or if you haven’t seen it before), this is a good time to catch it as it was meant to be seen on the big screen.

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When: Sunday, Aug. 13
Where: AMC Chattanooga 18, Regal Hamilton Place 8
Rating: R

Stray Cat Rock
Leave it to Chris Dortch and Rose Cox over at The Palace Picture House to bring something truly weird and wonderful to Chattanooga. The “Stray Cat Rock” series of films—”Delinquent Girl Boss,” “Wild Jumbo,” “Sex Hunter,” “Machine Animal” and “Beat ’71” (although the movies often go by different titles, depending on where you see them)—were directed by Yasuharu Hasebe (“Massacre Gun,” “Retaliation”) and Toshiya Fujita (“Lady Snowblood”) and are filled with over-the-top violence, a vibrant visual aesthetic and the carefree carnality that exploitation films so often deliver. Created between 1970 and 1971, these films feature girl biker gangs, psychedelic imagery, rock ‘n’ roll and all the other riotous things you could hope to see in these kinds of film. For fans of Japanese exploitation films, this collection of movies is a must-see, and it’s an unexpected joy to have the opportunity to see them in town.

When: Friday–Thursday, Aug. 11–17
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: Not rated

Battleship Potemkin
One of the greatest films ever made, director Sergei Eisenstein’s “Battleship Potemkin” was incendiary in its revolutionary ideals and philosophy. Following a group of sailors who mutiny aboard the titular battleship, which is in service to the Imperial Russian Navy’s Black Sea Fleet, the film tried to convey, through clever editing and unprecedented levels of violence for its time, a story that highlights the historic and courageous uprising of those men—an act that is now seen as being one of the first steps taken toward the Russian Revolution of 1917. In stark black and white, we’re given a glimpse of the deplorable conditions under which the sailors lived; and, along with the hard treatment of their superiors, viewers can see exactly where the seeds of rebellion were sown. It’s a culturally important piece of Russian cinema and a film that everyone should see at least once.

When: Sunday, Aug. 13
Where: Heritage House Arts and Civic Center
Rating: Not rated

Landline
Directed by Gillian Robespierre, “Landline” follows the story of two sisters (played by Jenny Slate and Abby Quinn) in the ’90s in New York City who think their dad is having an affair. As much an impression of a specific period in time as it is a humanist look into the bonds that can hold a family together, “Landline” expertly arranges the experiences and emotions of its characters to provide the proper foundation for the comedy and drama that hold sway over their lives. And along with a slew of fantastic actors and actresses, including John Turturro, Edie Falco and Jay Duplass, the film manages to hold on to the heart of each person and never gives way to easy answers or stereotypical plot contrivances. It’s an honest and moving look at the things that hold people together and the things that can push them apart.

When: Friday–Thursday, Aug. 11–17
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: R

Joshua Pickard covers local and national music, film and other aspects of pop culture. You can contact him on FacebookTwitter or by emailThe opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, not Nooga.com or its employees.

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