Director Óskar Thór Axelsson’s acclaimed horror film “I Remember You” will screen at The Palace Picture House starting this weekend. 

The Week in Film is a column dedicated to bringing awareness to award-winning films, special movie screenings, rereleases, limited-distribution runs and avant cinema that should be seen in theaters to be properly appreciated.

I Remember You
While the majority of scary movies tend to cluster right before or during Halloween, one of the best this year actually falls a bit after the spookiest holiday. Directed by Óskar Thór Axelsson, “I Remember You” deals with a collection of seemingly random characters whose stories intertwine and unfold over the course of the film. Tales of haunted houses, a hanging in a church and missing children all collide in one of the best thrillers of the year. Both a disquieting ghost story and a discussion on life after death, “I Remember You” is gorgeously shot and offers little in the way of comfortable answers. Both a dark character study and home to dramatic supernatural events, it will have you second-guessing yourself and shaking with each new revelation.

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When: Friday–Thursday, Nov. 17–22
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: Not rated

The Square
A Swedish satirical drama directed by Ruben Östlund, “The Square” follows the life of an art museum curator in Stockholm and delves into the manufactured controversy of a new exhibit. A vicious send-up of greed and careless ideologies, the film brazenly picks apart the opulence and superficiality of the modern art landscape. It was awarded the Palme d’Or at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival and has been championed by a number of prominent film critics. The film itself is a fascinating philosophical treatise on the nature of humanity and our general lack of regard for one another. “The Square” isn’t a feel-good movie—it’s a dark look into the consequences and machinations of formal society and why we must remain guarded in its presence.

When: Friday–Thursday, Nov. 17–22
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: R

My Friend Dahmer
The events and motivations that led infamous serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer to rape, murder and dismember 17 people between 1978 and 1991 are still not fully known. It is one of the most gruesome criminal cases in modern U.S. history and has been the subject of countless documentaries and books. In the new film “My Friend Dahmer,” director Marc Meyers tries to arrive at some midpoint between the demonic accusations of the grieving and a sense of failed humanity spurred on by a troubled childhood. Based on the 2012 graphic novel of the same name by cartoonist John Backderf (a childhood friend of Dahmer’s), the film shows how evil can be shaped and driven by the reality of our own experiences.

When: Tuesday–Thursday, Nov. 14–16
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: R

Mansfield 66/67
A documentary that focuses on the last two years of Hollywood icon Jayne Mansfield’s life and her death in a car crash, “Mansfield 66/67” uses old interviews, vivid sequences of animation and experimental dance numbers to highlight the absurdity of the circumstances surrounding her death. Was her death a terrible accident or the work of a curse enacted on her then-boyfriend Sam Brody by Anton LaVey, the head of the Church of Satan? The film approaches this question by acknowledging and examining all the outrageous details of its tragic subject. Mansfield was incredibly smart, spoke five languages and was outspokenly antiwar, so her life was a giant cauldron of strange events and experiences. “Mansfield 66/67” may not provide a definitive answer to what caused that fatal wreck, but it does shed light on a very ostentatious life and a death that left so many questions unanswered.

When: Tuesday–Thursday, Nov. 14–16
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: Not rated

Joshua Pickard covers local and national music, film and other aspects of pop culture. You can contact him on FacebookTwitter or by emailThe opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, not Nooga.com or its employees.

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