Holiday classic “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” will have a single screening at Regal Hamilton Place 8 Dec. 9.

The Week in Film is a column dedicated to bringing awareness to award-winning films, special movie screenings, rereleases, limited-distribution runs and avant cinema that should be seen in theaters to be properly appreciated.

National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
A modern Christmas classic, “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” follows the extreme misadventures of the Griswold family as they get ready for holiday festivities. Starring Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo, the film was directed by Jeremiah Chechik and written by John Hughes. Filled with weird and awkward characters (yes, Randy Quaid is in there), it takes us through power-draining Christmas decorations, disastrous dinner parties and a SWAT team singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” while burning reindeer and Santa Claus rain down from the sky. If you’ve seen it, you understand. If not, now’s your time to become familiar with the ambitious and misguided antics of Clark Griswold.

When: Saturday, Dec. 9
Where: Regal Hamilton Place 8
Rating: PG-13

Thelma
“Thelma” tells the story of a young, introverted girl who leaves her home on the west coast of Norway to study at a school in Oslo. While there, she experiences increasingly violent seizures and is drawn to a fellow student named Anja. She eventually comes to realize these seizures have unlocked supernatural abilities that are linked to some truly tragic events in her past. Gorgeously shot and emotionally intuitive (even when the supernatural aspects come into play), the film deals with sexuality and repression in a way that feels honest without resorting to blatant sermonizing. It’s built on a mix of ideas and perspectives that leave you asking questions about the nature of self-identity and the consequences of burying your feelings.

When: Friday–Thursday, Dec. 8–14
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: Not rated

The Breadwinner
Based on Deborah Ellis’ bestselling novel, “The Breadwinner” follows 11-year-old Parvana as she grows up under the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. When her father is unjustly arrested, she cuts her hair and disguises herself as a boy so she can take a job and provide money for her family. She finds dangers and spectacles with each new experience. She’s also constantly trying to find information about her dad and how she can reunite them all. From executive producer Angelina Jolie, the movie highlights the ingenuity and bravery of someone who fights back against repression and does her best to make the most of a bad situation. It’s heartbreaking and beautiful, a true animated wonder.

When: Friday–Thursday, Dec. 8–14
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: PG-13

Bruk Out!
“Bruk Out!” follows six women as they compete for the title of International Dancehall Queen. A touchstone of Jamaican life, dancehall culture is marked by hypersexualized movements and a sense of community among the dancers. Directed by Cori McKenna, this documentary shows them all going through ecstatic routines but also shows them away from the dance floor. Many of these women see the dance as a way for them to rise above their individual struggles, including issues with body image, poverty and domestic abuse. For a short period of time, the dance is all there is, and it allows them to reclaim their sexuality and accept themselves for who they are.

When: Monday–Thursday, Dec. 4–7
Where: The Palace Picture House
Rating: Not rated

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?
Presented by Turner Classic Movies on the occasion of its 50th anniversary, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?” will be screened at a couple of theaters this week. Directed by Stanley Kramer, the film follows the obstacles between Joanna Drayton (Katharine Houghton) and her fiancé, John Prentice (Sidney Poitier), as they attempt to introduce her parents to John—whom they’ve never met. The fact that John is black causes no small amount of concern. Released only six months before anti-miscegenation laws were struck down, this movie was one of the first films to present such a union in a positive light.

When: Sunday, Dec. 10
Where: Regal Hamilton Place 8
Rating: PG

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
To what lengths would you go to exact justice for a loved one? That’s the question Mildred Hayes (played by Academy Award winner Frances McDormand) attempts to answer in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” the latest film from director Martin McDonagh. After her daughter is raped and murdered, the police are unable to discover much in the way of evidence and have even less success with naming suspects. While not inept, the local sheriff realizes that there is simply not enough to go on and finds his investigation leading nowhere. Not content with his assessment, Mildred rents three large billboards outside town and prints them with antagonistic messages for the sheriff, who must also deal with his own emerging personal troubles.

When: Monday–Wednesday, Dec. 4–6
Where: AMC Chattanooga 18, AMC Majestic 12
Rating: R

Loving Vincent
“Loving Vincent” is the first fully painted animated film, which chronicles the life and death of artist Vincent van Gogh. Compiled from 65,000 frames of oil on canvas drawings that were created using the same techniques that van Gogh pioneered, the film is an astonishing work of art. The filmmakers’ choice to employ classically trained painters instead of traditional animators gives the movie a refreshingly unique perspective, with 125 artists (out of 5,000 applicants) working on the film. Using paintings van Gogh completed in his lifetime as inspiration, the painters realize his story with an immaculate degree of reverence.

When: Monday–Wednesday, Dec. 4–6
Where: AMC Chattanooga 18
Rating: PG-13

Joshua Pickard covers local and national music, film and other aspects of pop culture. You can contact him on FacebookTwitter or by emailThe opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, not Nooga.com or its employees.